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What Is It Like to Be Pregnant With ADHD?


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what is it like to be pregnant with adhd


What is it like to be pregnant with ADHD? In this episode, I interview Patricia Sung, host of Motherhood in ADHD, about what it’s like to be pregnant with ADHD. She also gives her best advice for ADHD women who are pregnant (or would like to be someday) – she really knows her stuff!

If you like this interview, please subscribe to the podcast!

About Patricia
Patricia’s Diagnosis Story
Pregnant With ADHD
Giving Ourselves Credit
The Comparison Game
Speaking Up
Raising Awareness
Where to Find Patricia

 

IMPERFECT TRANSCRIPT

 

Sarah Snyder

This is the adulting with ADHD podcast self empowerment for women with ADHD. Today, I am excited to introduce you all to Patricia Sung. She is host of the motherhood and ADHD podcast. Welcome, Patricia.

Hey, hi. How’s

Sarah Snyder

it going?

Patricia Sung

Hey, just hanging in here with you know, mom in virtual schooling working from home all the all the juggling.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah, so why don’t you um, tell us a little bit about you and what you’re up to right now? Well,

About Patricia

Patricia Sung

I host the motherhood in ADHD podcast, which is specifically for moms that have ADHD. So I help disorganized, overwhelmed moms get their it together, one step at a time, so that you feel confident in running your home life. I think we are just a very undiagnosed and underserved population. Moms with ADHD are juggling all of the things and feeling like they’re supposed to be able to do so much of it easily. And there’s just a really rough expectation that is present in, in life today. And I want moms to know that, like you’re not broken, there’s nothing wrong with you. This is who we are. And when we learn about who we are, we can figure out what are the strategies and tools and everything that we can do to make life more doable for us, it doesn’t have to look like what your best friend’s doing, or that lady on Pinterest is doing. You need to find what works for you.

And

Patricia Sung

then you can like take this like huge deep breath and, and relax. Because when you know what you’re dealing with you can, you can make it work. So I just want to share everything that I can to help other moms feel good about who they are and what they’re doing, and that they are being a great mom. And hopefully encourage a lot of people on the way.

Sarah Snyder

That’s a really awesome mission to have. were you diagnosed later in life or Bruce? Yeah, same thing here. So tell us a little bit about that. However, you know, I

Patricia’s Diagnosis Story


Patricia Sung

am your classic, twice exceptional and attentive girl, I flew under the radar. For a long time, I did really well in school, because I’m smart. And I had structure imposed by all the adults in my life. And I seemingly did pretty well. I mean, I was on honor roll and all that. And then underneath the surface was a horrible level of perfectionism. Because as a kid, they kept telling me like, well, you’re just making careless mistakes, you need to pay more attention, you need to go back and check that, like I had already checked it 15 times. And so this ridiculously high level of perfectionism under there. And I definitely have OCD tendencies of trying to control things when I feel out of control. And people would have called me like a very, like worried child that is code for anxiety. And I was just panicking, I’m inside trying to basically like rationalize, this is what they’re telling me it’s supposed to be, but yet, this is what’s happening on the inside. And it doesn’t match. And as a kid, you don’t know any better. You’re just you’re just trying to do what you think you’re supposed to do. And so I had these not so great coping mechanisms developed. And, but I was functioning pretty well. And then I got to college

and

Patricia Sung

the doodoo hit the fan. I mean, it was a hot mess. I nearly failed out I had a jumble but drop bunch of classes. And I almost lost my scholarship had some trauma in their depression. And that’s when I was diagnosed is when I think we went to a doctor who said I I think you have this you need to go to the Student Services Center, and talk to this person. And I’m sorry, what? Like, I don’t like mind blowing like this, this is what I’m dealing with. But, um, it was just a shock. And so I was diagnosed around like 19 or 20. And, and thankfully, I had some really great women who took me under their wing and helped me figure out study strategies that work for ADHD and um, I did start taking Ritalin because before that I was just drinking a ridiculous amount of frappuccinos if you remember back in the day, those little bottles and those little bottles of rpgnow

Oh, yes.

Patricia Sung

So so many of those. And, and that Yeah, so that’s how I ended up getting diagnosed is that I went in for a lot of other problems not knowing that this was my actual like root issue.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah, so this is all sounding very familiar. And thank goodness for those those student med centers the Wow, I totally, I know what you mean, I want to go back to something you said about way back that one of the first things she said was this idea that as mothers, we could totally be us and in our skin, and have this ADHD and live a good life. And the reason I actually brought you on here was to discuss the hormone experience, because I think a lot of us are discovering, and this is how we connected on Instagram is that we aren’t talking about this enough. And this is our very, our very being like our hormones is as basic as it gets. And there’s just not a lot of info out there. And so you graciously accepted my pitch that we talked about your pregnancy, and just what that was like, as a woman with ADHD because I just don’t think enough of us really know until we’re in the thick of it. So I wanted to start with just in a general sense, what what your pregnancy was like with ADHD at this point, you were diagnosed or? Yes, you were okay. So yeah, um, from what you can remember, because I know for me, it’s very vague what I remember. But I, I want to, I want to hear what you have to say about what it was like? Well, I

Pregnant With ADHD

Patricia Sung

fully believe that that is one of God’s gifts to women is that we forget how terrible the pregnancy because then we would never have any more children.

Sarah Snyder

I agree.

Patricia Sung

I totally hate being pregnant. I try to tell people that as much as I can, because there is this sensationalized view of how wonderful pregnancy is and how it’s glorious, and you’re growing a human and Isn’t it beautiful, the creation of life. And it sets this unrealistic expectation on us that we have to thoroughly enjoy the whole thing. And that is just not real. Like, I understand that there’s some like tiny percentage of the population who thinks and feels glorious in that time. And part of that for me was that my mom was one of those people. I’m one of five kids, my mom loved to being pregnant. She always talked about how she felt the best in those times. And I really thought it was going to be a glorious, like unicorns, rainbows and kittens experience. And it wasn’t I absolutely hated it. And oh, was so bad. I was I threw up every day for seven months with my oldest son and until the day my second son was born. So it was a it was a rough experience for me, like my boys were healthy. And like, I feel like I need to say like the disclaimer of like, big Yes, there. Excuse me, there could be very serious things that went on. And I was very lucky. None of those happened. But in the actual like pregnancy part, it was hard for me. I mean, not only just in the vomiting constantly, I had every symptom you could read in a book. Any kind of like weird, strange, extra fluid, what it didn’t matter I at all. And when you look at all the symptoms of pregnancy, it’s like, you took all these pieces have ADHD, and just like lit them on fire. It’s like a dumpster fire.

Sarah Snyder

I love that. Yeah. Yes, yes.

Patricia Sung

I mean, cuz like when I was thinking about this yesterday, as I’m like, okay, like, what, you know, where do I want to go with this? And what do I want women to hear? I was like, okay, you know, one of the issues you have when you’re pregnant is increased fatigue, like, Okay, well, ADHD, women already are fatigued. We are tired, having ADHD is hard. And so many ADHD women are diagnosed with chronic fatigue. Instead of ADHD because they go into the doctor saying, I’m so tired, I’m struggling. I’m so worn out at the end of the day, I just crash and they’re getting this other diagnosis, that is a symptom of their ADHD.

Then like, Okay, well, what

Patricia Sung

else is a big pregnancy issue of Okay, well, you’re not sleeping as well, because you’re uncomfortable and huge. And then you’re not sleeping, like quality wise, well, either you’re getting less sleep and less quality sleep. It’s like, well, that’s a huge problem. ADHD people need their sleep. That’s a huge, huge, huge, um, like,

Sarah Snyder

I agree completely.

Patricia Sung

You need to make sure that you’re getting enough sleep and sleep problems are one of the most common core comorbidities that we have, you know, getting to sleep staying asleep, waking up in the morning, like every, every part along the way. And here, that’s another thing, pregnancies making worse. And

the,

Patricia Sung

like, you’re probably not exercising regularly, which is really helpful for your ADHD. And you come to the medicines you can’t take while you’re pregnant. So now you have that tool, it’s taken out of your toolbox. And what else there’s issues

of

Patricia Sung

like having a lower body image because you’re seeing how you’re changing and you’re gaining weight. And now you look at your body and you’re like, this doesn’t even look like me. So you

have all that

Patricia Sung

stirring up and a lot of ichi women have very poor self esteem and self image because you’ve spent your whole life hearing all these negative messages of why can’t you get it together? What’s wrong with you? What if you just try harder, especially layering on some more negative self talk? Um, and it was funny because I asked my husband last night, I said, what was the worst part about me being pregnant? And he goes, yes. Yes, that’s thanks, husband.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah, that’s pretty accurate.

Patricia Sung

He’s like, okay, No, but seriously, it was the emotional volatility, like my mood swings. Were just all over the place. And like that, I mean, I was a fine, fine, fine, angry, fine, fine, fine. crying. I mean, it was just all over. And that’s, again, emotional regulation and energy regulation. Those are things that are again, hard having ADHD and then pregnancy just like,

Sarah Snyder

exactly. So yeah. Yeah. It’s crazy. I was actually gonna say, right before that, about the emotional regulation, and then it’s the cognitive load because you’re planning and buying, or feel like you’re feeling like you have to buy all the things and plan on the things Ember already tax to begin with. So did you experience a lot of that? The planning and all the advice and all the information overload? I mean, I’m sure that was really difficult.

Patricia Sung

Yeah, you have this huge stress dump, too, because yeah, you’re thinking about, like, there’s the very obvious like logistical things like I need to buy a crib and, and planning the whole nursery is a project that we have to get done on a timeline, also hard. And then you’re thinking about just from a level of, now I’m responsible for this human, for the rest of its life. So you have that added weight and stress. And you’re just adding like, layer and layer upon what you’re already doing, you’re already stressed. And I think we think going in when we don’t know yet that we have, like this amount of responsibility as ourselves. And then we have this amount, if you’re, if you have a partner or a spouse, like their needs, and then you have combined together, what you need to do together. And it’s not just one person plus one person is to, now you have my stuff, your stuff and our together stuff, and you got to balance all three of those. So when you put another person in, it’s not adding one more pile of responsibilities. Now you got all three individuals plus each person’s part like relationship. So you got, you know, dad, and kid, Mom and kid, still juggling the parents together. Plus, now you’ve got your whole family dynamic. It’s like you’re taking it from like, level one by yourself, then marriage is like, okay, now I’m dealing with three things you advocate also in your, like, level seven, or eight. And that’s only one kid, most of us have been one. So it just like, more and more and more and more. And I feel like a lot of moms have found what works for them as a single person. And then you know, you adjust it when you add a partner in, and then all of a sudden, you add this kid in and it’s a disaster. It’s a hot mess. And that’s when a lot of moms start to fall apart. In that moment of adding, and I’m gonna circle back around now to the hormones of like, also women with ADHD are like, I think it’s three times more likely to have postpartum anxiety and depression because of the hormone issues. So you’re not only adding in all that, that we’ve already talked about now, one is added, again, is the likelihood that you’re going to be struggling with hormone related chemical related additional problems, but you are not right.

Giving Ourselves Credit

Sarah Snyder

Yeah, absolutely. And I feel like this is a good time. to pause, and this is all definitely true and valid to pause. And also, let me ask you this, what were some things that have surprised you about the whole thing, things that you were able to juggle? And when you look back, you’re like, wow, I did that. And it’s like, holy cow, we can do difficult things. What kind of moments like that? Did you have?

Patricia Sung

I mean, for one, I, I survived? I made it through.

Sarah Snyder

That’s the goal. That’s it?

Patricia Sung

Yeah, I think there’s so many times as moms, we don’t stop and take that moment to say, that was great. That went well, we made it. So part of ADHD is that we don’t do that reflection and assessment. Hmm, yeah. But to stop and say, Wow, look at what I did, I need the human brought into this world, and it’s still life. Like, that is good. That is huge. Great.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah. And there

Patricia Sung

are so many of those little things that we don’t give ourselves credit for. That’s one way that I want moms to know, like, even though this is so heavy, and burdensome, and you’re carrying so much weight around, you are doing an amazing job, you are juggling all the things you are, you are giving your kids for a reason they’re yours. Because that’s where they’re meant to be. I know a lot of 80 shoe women who tell me, I feel bad that my kids are stuck with me, they could have had a such a better mom with somebody else. And it literally breaks my heart when they say that because your kids were gifted to you for a reason. You’re the you’re their mom, because you were the one meant to teach them and grow them. And all those other moms out there, maybe don’t have your problems, but they still have problems. None of us are exempt from life problems. None of us are perfect. Even if they look super great on the outside, and then their Instagram photos. And they’re struggling too.

So

The Comparison Game

Patricia Sung

we really need to let go of that comparison game as moms and focus on what we’re doing well, and grow. And build on that positivity. Because the more that we focus on what’s going wrong, the more we’re going to see it, it’s our brains job is to keep us safe, it is hardwired to look for things that support what we currently believe. Yeah, so if you keep repeating your negative messages, your brain is going to keep looking for evidence to support those negative messages. So we have to take an active role in saying, I am purposely going to focus on what went well, in order to train my brain to look for that evidence, not what’s pulling me down like not to say that we just like, Oh, I’m just gonna pretend all my problems don’t exist. No. But the more that you develop that habit of looking at what you’re doing well, it will grow it will. Kind of it’s like a snowball effect of like, once it starts going, it will continue onward. I mean, I’m saying it’s like, oh, I’ll never have a negative thought again. No, it’s not realistic.

Sarah Snyder

But I yeah, you know, I totally agree with you. I used to hate that word positivity until I give it a shot. And and I’m sure you’re familiar with the book positivity by Barbara Fredrickson, maybe not. But I mean, it’s funny, because a lot of what you’re saying is what she studied in her book, so I just assumed you had read it. Yeah, you’re, you’re on top of it. But yeah, it’s exactly that. I used to think it was this hokey Pollyanna stuff, but then I give it a chance. And you’re right, it’s snowballs. And if you cultivate that, those good feelings are going to feel better than a quick dopamine fix that might feel good in the moment. But if you could cultivate this like holistic sense of, you’re okay in your own skin, that includes hormones, that includes the kind of Mom You are like, that’s intrinsic to like, every fiber of your being. And so, I love that you brought that up, because I’m one of those mothers like, I battle that all the freaking time. The good enough thing Like, constantly So, it’s nice to know, I’m not the only one because it really

Patricia Sung

I think, you know, like when we, when we’re vulnerable, vulnerable and say, I struggle with this, then other people feel safe saying, hey, me too, that that’s hard for me too. But if no one ever says, This is hard, or I feel like I’m not good enough, or there’s times where I put my kids to bed, and I’m like, What? Like, what did I even? How did I even make them a better person today, all I did was yell and tell them that they didn’t do this right and get on. Like, if we don’t make that known, and we don’t let that be normal, because it is I I have yet to find a mom, who doesn’t feel that way. I mean, there’s different degrees, but we have to be willing to make that yuckiness unnormal, because it is normal. And I feel like that’s one of the ways we do that, like, you know, saying to just eat at you because he separates, and makes you feel like you’re the only one that’s feeling this way, you’re the only one with that problem. It’s you, you’re the problem. So if we know that it’s not that we’re the only person dealing with this, then you can let go of a lot of that negative talk in your head about how it’s just you. And then it’s not a like, personal responsibility and weight and like personality that you take on. Because, you know, hey, Patricia has to deal with that. Sarah has to do with that. I’m not the only one out there, even if there’s no one in your friend circle who’s willing to be that vulnerable and say, Hey, I feel like a really crap mom. Five days out of the week. Right? Exactly.

Speaking Up

Sarah Snyder

Right. Yeah, it’s a real thing. And I’m glad we’re talking about it more, because that’s how, what was the quote I heard this week, sunlight is the best disinfectant, right? I don’t know who originated that. I don’t know where it came from. But it’s appropriate for right now. But it’s appropriate. In general, I’ll have to look that up and see who said that? I don’t remember. Haha, obvious ADHD joke there.

Patricia Sung

When you open the closet and show people, your skeletons, and you let that light in, that’s when we all can start to feel community. And and No, we’re not. I mean, that’s something I say all the time. Like, you are not alone and you are not broken. This, this is how we were created. And that’s okay. We don’t have to fit the mold of everybody else. And that’s all right. It. Yeah.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah. And especially with hormones, because how much of our lives where we conditioned not to talk about things like our periods, or we don’t want to say it’s a hormone thing, because we’re tired of being pathologized. Like, oh, she’s just heard her hormones, and, you know, all the stigma attached to that. And then you add on the systemic issues with the medical field. And I was talking to my therapist yesterday, and she said, the funniest thing, that’s true, she’s like, you know, if men had to deal with this hormone stuff, it would be figured out by now, you know. And I, and I said, we would have a blue pill for it.

Patricia Sung

Exactly. Well, I mean, because in my cousin, so in November, I did a whole series on, like, energy regulation, emotional regulation, and self regulation is wrapping up my executive function series. And in that research, I found a really great webinar by Dr. Sandra kui. And it was from I should have written this down the in ADHD group in the European Union. And she had a fabulous webinar for like, it was at least an hour, maybe an hour and a half, on hormones in women. And it was fascinating. Like I say, I’ll send you the link. It was Yes,

please, please do.

Raising Awareness

Patricia Sung

But the best part about it was that she’s one of the few people that’s talking about it. There are like, like little spiders here in there. But overall, it’s not studied because when people choose their research subjects for scientific studies, they pick men because they don’t want hormone influences. Interesting.

Sarah Snyder

I look Wow, that’s super enlightening. Yeah.

Patricia Sung

So even just women as a whole, they’re going to choose men first because they don’t have the hormonal, you know, roller coaster, but then to study women’s hormones, a lot of men don’t really care about Women’s hormones, they’re not going to get as a research project, right? So we need more women in science to advance women’s health. But then on top of that you put in women with ADHD, well, we’re even more of a hot mess. Nobody is trying. Yeah, there are literally no like formal full out studies of ADHD women and their hormones. That makes it like, surveys

Sarah Snyder

and anecdotal stuff. Yeah, that makes total sense. And that, that tells you a lot right there. And I think this is like a common theme we’re all dealing with right now, as a country, but it’s like, and, and medicines eyes, there was a control group and a variable group. And we were the variables instead of saying, Hey, we’re all the control group that deserve inspections. So that’s super interesting. I’m gonna have to look at that. That webinar. That sounds fascinating. Yeah.

Patricia Sung

I mean, she just went really deep into, like tearing my estrogen levels and how it matches with your, you know, with your cycle, and estrogen is directly related to your neurotransmitters. And I mean, it was, like, all the things I already knew in my heart. She was telling me, this is true and valid, and we need more studies and more information on it.

Sarah Snyder

And that must have felt amazing. I mean, just the the affirmation that this isn’t all just a bunch of junk in your head, just like ADHD, you know, it’s like, oh, my gosh, this is science. I’m not crazy, or weird or stupid, or whatever you want to say, you know, what people tend to think that.

Patricia Sung

Yeah. Fascinating. science to, like, scientifically based. It’s science. Again, I think this goes, right. I mean, but I don’t wanna get on like a soapbox about Oh, yeah, no, no. But of course, when you think about, you know, women were treated as second class citizens for so long. So men didn’t want to talk about periods and hormones. Like I get that. That’s not of interest to them. Because it’s not their problem. I mean, well, ends up being their problem. But you know, right. Yeah. But that, you know, it’s been brushed under the rug for so long. We need to be out there talking about it and normalizing it, because it’s a, it’s a fact of life. Like, literally, every woman is dealing with this. It’s not like a surprise or a secret. We all, we all have hormones. I hate that it’s this like, meme worthy topic, because it is serious. And it really affects some women greatly. Yeah, I had no idea the level of like, Oh, it’s called pre menstrual

Sarah Snyder

dis pmdd. Yeah,

Patricia Sung

yeah, thank you. I had, I had heard of it. But I didn’t realize the level to which so many women are suffering from that this is serious stuff. And I want those women to know that they are not the only person who has issues around their cycle. And if we don’t talk about it, those women are just sitting there beating themselves up or harming themselves, instead of getting help, because they think they need to hide it and, and shove it under the rug. Instead of saying, like, this isn’t my fault. Like I didn’t give myself hormones, like this is just how your body functions. And when you know that, you can then get help for it. That’s why you know, people are like, I don’t don’t really need a diagnosis, like, what am I gonna do? The To me, the biggest part is when you know what your problem is. And I don’t see a problem, I guess what your situation is, like, if you can put a name to it and know that it is real, and it exists for many people, then it’s not in your head and you’re not doubting yourself again, taking on that, like personality of shame, or guilt, or there’s something wrong with me, you can then make changes to improve whatever you’re dealing with, because it’s normal, and other people have dealt with it. So there are like ideas out there and you can reach out for help and ask other women, what do you do about this? And find what works for you?

Sarah Snyder

Absolutely, I I really love that it’s you know, you can’t even address it until you know what it is. So just talking about what this is even with you like even though I know all these things to be true. Just talking to you. So reaffirming that Yeah, we get to talk about this we get to this is valid, you know, it’s um, it’s a wonderful feeling. And I’m so jazzed to have been able to talk to you about this. And before we go, I wanted to I wanted you to let the listeners know where to where to find you. First of all, the best place to find you. I saw I think I saw some tic tocs of you. I think you’re on Tic tock, right? Yes.

I’m not on

Patricia Sung

one of my good friends who’s also really awesome lady in the ADHD community. Her name is Camden. I think her username is Camden underscore ADHD. She does kind of videos about ADHD, seven, she had put my podcasts and some of her

Sarah Snyder

videos. Okay, because I was on your feet, and I was like, are these tic tocs? These are hilarious. That’s so funny. Cool.

Patricia Sung

I feel like Yeah, one day, I’ll probably get there. But I feel like I’m trying to recognize my ADHD tendencies that I will probably spend 400 hours there. So I’m just saying no to the tick tock right now. Yeah, just stick with my Instagram sometimes until Facebook, and, you know, try to rein it in. Because I could literally just don’t mean just rolling through. So yeah, the,

Sarah Snyder

the struggle is very real. So where can we find you on the things that you’re focusing on, on the things that you’re really going all in with?

Where To Find Patricia

Patricia Sung

So I, you can find me most on Instagram, I love posts on there. It’s at motherhood and ADHD. And I podcasts, obviously, you can listen to that pretty much in any podcast app, you can locate it, if you’re not into podcasts, you can go to my website, and I put the transcriptions on there. So if you’re not an auditory learner, you want to read you can read there in the on my website, Patricia Sutton, calm. And I also have a great little like freebie a love to offer. Mom, they have quite a few on my website. But the one that I’m like jazzed about right now is what can you do for your ADHD that doesn’t involve medicine, not to say that medicine is bad, I take medicine, but I know a lot of people either don’t want to or can’t. And these are ways that you can manage your ADHD without or I guess, in addition to or without medicine, because it really even if you’re taking medicine, you should be doing a whole lot of other things. That’s just one tool in your tool kit. Yeah, it’s like a brainstorm list of like, here’s all the things that you can work on. And then I tell you the bottom, just pick one, and work on one thing for right now. And you can add on as you go. What fits you but here’s the starting point of trying to do how many other like 1520 ideas where you can ramp up so you can get that at Patricia sun.com forward slash beyond and hyphen, meds. And you can come back.

Sarah Snyder

Awesome. Well, Patricia, thank you very much. It was wonderful to meet you. And

Patricia Sung

okay, in HD style. I just realized I didn’t answer one of your questions. Can I? Really quick? Absolutely. homie, you asked me like, what did I learn? And I started off on a tangent. And I realized I didn’t actually answer the question. Yeah. In that tangent of like learning about myself, but practical. I really like practical tips for moms a lot of times. Yes, of course, get caught up.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah, go for it.

Patricia Sung

Yeah. So my like major tip is being one, lower your expectations, you can’t do everything that you used to when you’re pregnant, your body is already using like half of your energy towards growing this human. So you only have half of your energy left.

So

Patricia Sung

expectations should be like bare minimum of getting by like keeping your kids alive, basic functions. And then if you can do more great, but you know, just tipper demo, but

Sarah Snyder

bass right there. I hate to I hate to interrupt you. But that’s everything right there. I mean, that is it. I mean, all your other tips are going to be amazing, too. But that is that right there is that the the thing I’ve heard across the board from everyone, and it rang true for me as well. So continue, I just had to give an emphasis there on that.

God, just just just take it down a notch.

Sarah Snyder

Yeah.

Patricia Sung

And in that lowering of expectations, being realistic, and what you personally can accomplish, we’re all going to be in different seasons. Obviously, if it’s your first kid versus your fourth kid, that’s a different ballgame. Then if you’re working outside the home, versus you know, caring for a sick parent the same time like there’s all kinds of pieces that go into it. So be realistic and what you can accomplish in this season. have a talk with your spouse or partner or with yourself of what has to get done.

What can you let go of

Patricia Sung

for this time and no, it’s not forever. It’s not like you’re saying bye to hobbies for the next 40 years. Maybe it’s just for the next six months or a year and then where can you get help? What can you outsource? Can you you know order food in or buy the like pre packaged meals or But what is it that’s going to make your life easier. So like, outsource or ask for help in? what’s realistic for you. And then my favorite quote from Dr. kui was be aware, so you can prepare. If you know that things are going to be hard, you can adjust beforehand, instead of being totally just beat down and frustrated and like in tears, like, that’s probably gonna happen anyway, because you’re pregnant, you’re crying. Yeah. But if you know ahead of time that that’s coming, you can make adjustments and plan before you hit that breaking point, or maybe at least push the breaking point a little a little farther down the road. So I’m sorry, I just realized, like, let me give my tips before we say bye, cuz

Sarah Snyder

that’s amazing. No, I’m glad you did that. Because I, I did hear the the non practical stuff, the deep stuff. I was like, yeah, that’s what you do. But you’re right. I mean, it helps to have practical. Yeah, and I’ll just piggyback on that. I know for me, I, I froze a lot of stuff ahead of time. And I know when you’re pregnant, you’re not really in the mood to cook. I didn’t do anything fancy. But I did. Like if I was cooking, I cooked extra and gradually built up a stockpile so that when the baby was there, I wasn’t stressing out about dinner. And I also that’s how I found out about the Instant Pot was when I had a newborn and we became best friends. And we’ve been best friends ever since. So I wanted to throw that in there. But yeah, just brace for the brace for the spin and just go with the spin lean into it because it’s going to happen anyway. Don’t fight it. I love it. Great, great advice. Oh, Patricia. It’s been a pleasure. Thank you so much. And I’m gonna let you get back to your virtual teaching. Have fun with you. I’m

gonna be here. I really appreciate it, Sarah. No problem. Take care.

Sarah Snyder

Bye. Bye bye.



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